Emerald Germs of Ireland

Emerald Germs of Ireland Meet Pat McNab forty five years old often to be found endlessly puffing smokes and propping up the counter of Sullivan s Select Bar or sitting on his mother s knee both of them singing away togethe

  • Title: Emerald Germs of Ireland
  • Author: Patrick McCabe
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 288
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Meet Pat McNab, forty five years old, often to be found endlessly puffing smokes and propping up the counter of Sullivan s Select Bar or sitting on his mother s knee, both of them singing away together like some ridiculous two headed human juke box But that was all before the story really begins Emerald Germs of Ireland is, in essence, Pat McNab s post matricide year ThMeet Pat McNab, forty five years old, often to be found endlessly puffing smokes and propping up the counter of Sullivan s Select Bar or sitting on his mother s knee, both of them singing away together like some ridiculous two headed human juke box But that was all before the story really begins Emerald Germs of Ireland is, in essence, Pat McNab s post matricide year This is another great romp from the master of black comedy Emerald Germs is an extraordinary confection Melancholy, nasty, and extremely funny Jane Shilling, Sunday Telegraph A mesmerising, disturbing and sometimes wildly funny book Carolyn Hart, Marie Claire, Book of the Month

    • ✓ Emerald Germs of Ireland || ✓ PDF Read by ¼ Patrick McCabe
      288 Patrick McCabe
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Emerald Germs of Ireland || ✓ PDF Read by ¼ Patrick McCabe
      Posted by:Patrick McCabe
      Published :2020-05-16T04:25:07+00:00

    About "Patrick McCabe"

    1. Patrick McCabe

      Patrick McCabe came to prominence with the publication of his third adult novel, The Butcher Boy, in 1992 the book was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in Britain and won the Irish Times Aer Lingus Prize for fiction McCabe s strength as an author lies in his ability to probe behind the veneer of respectability and conformity to reveal the brutality and the cloying and corrupting stagnation of Irish small town life, but he is able to find compassion for the subjects of his fiction His prose has a vitality and an anti authoritarian bent, using everyday language to deconstruct the ideologies at work in Ireland between the early 1960s and the late 1970s His books can be read as a plea for a pluralistic Irish culture that can encompass the past without being dominated by it.McCabe is an Irish writer of mostly dark and violent novels of contemporary, often small town, Ireland His novels include The Butcher Boy 1992 and Breakfast on Pluto 1998 , both shortlisted for the Booker Prize He has also written a children s book The Adventures of Shay Mouse and several radio plays broadcast by the RT and the BBC Radio 4 The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto have both been adapted into films by Irish director Neil Jordan.McCabe lives in Clones, Co Monaghan with his wife and two daughters.Pat McCabe is also credited with having invented the Bog Gothic genre.

    917 thoughts on “Emerald Germs of Ireland”

    1. When did matricide become comical? When Patrick McCabe started writing about it.Emerald Germs of Ireland is a story about Pat McNab and his sick and twisted little mind. He has a strange relationship with his mother, a little Norman Bates-esque at times. This strange relationship ultimately ends (and the story essentially begins) with Pat killing her, and his father, and then starting off into the town to knock off other "germs". The story is told through a series of short stories all revolving [...]


    2. I had no idea what was going on for a while and then I realised that that was the whole point of the story. No one really knows what is real and what is imagined, the protagonist or the reader. A little annoying for a while but ultimately an enjoyable read.If you've watched the Butcher Boy more than once you'll probably have Francie Brady in your head for a large part of this book.


    3. Entertaining at first, and then, ya know, you get it. It becomes quite redundant by chapter 6 - Irish song and murder, Irish song and murder


    4. Wacky good fun - probably a whole lot funnier if you know stock Irish problems and people. Not for someone who likes a realistic novel, or wants to read a pretty story.


    5. "A load of aul' shite" as the protagonist Pat McNabb might say. With a few exceptions, each of the 14 chapters starts with a song, an annoying character crossing paths with, and indeed often staying with, the aforementioned delusional, alcoholic, matricidal Pat, Pat getting thoroughly annoyed with the annoying character, Pat then killing and burying the annoying character in his garden.It takes until about the halfway mark before there is any exposition of Pat's back story so up to that point th [...]


    6. Never before have I given 3 stars to something so well written. It has noting to do with the author's ability to tell a story, but my own preference. You would think from the books description that this is about a troubled man that drinks too much. Instead it is about a man who is completely delusional. His delusions control the narrative. So you don't know if anything described is actually happening in the story. But the way the authors writes, his choice of words and way of conveying ideas, is [...]


    7. I picked this up without knowing a thing about it. My timing, I think, was based on my either immanent or recently finished trip to Ireland. I remember most of the book still - six years later. It left a deep impression on me - I think this was also around the time that I was starting to listen to the album Murder Ballads by Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds.Wonderful piece of writing. I'd recommend it to anyone.


    8. "I cordially dislike allegory" is a fine, gentlemanly way to qualify one's allegorical preference without appearing to be either a snob or a sourpuss. "Yo Mama so ugly she had to feed you with a slingshot" is neither fine nor gentlemanly, and certainly not as subtle as "Yo Mama so ugly she made Ray Charles flinch."So there you go. Always remember that in an age dominated by irony, conscious or not, this guy is not afraid to be sincere.


    9. I loved Butcher Boy so much that a thoughtful friend bought me this book. I couldn't actually finish it. There was too much flowery descriptions of an obviously mentally disturbed alcoholic. I just couldn't get into the writing, the character or the plot - which I assume would show up eventually if I had continued reading. I gave up half way through the book.


    10. Loved The Butcher Boy. Loved Breakfast on Pluto. Wanted so much to love this and every other McCabe book I could get my mitts on. But didn't love it. Liked some parts, but no love found. Will still pick up every book that this great writer writes from here on out hoping to find the love.


    11. A disappointment compared to other books of McCabe's. Some of these jewels sparkle, but others read like potboilers.









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